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A 58 yr. old single transwoman who loves quiet walks and 'pushing the envelope' in transadvocacy. A great sense of humor, loving to laugh, but dead serious when involved in human rights efforts.

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Welcome to the blog that is intended for education, information, entertainment, news and advancement...and it's all about the Transgender community! If you're a transgender individual, I hope it provides you with all of the above as well as empowerment; if you're not a transgender, hopefully this blog will help in giving you a better understanding of the transgender community and that community's issues, achievements/abilities, "temperaments" and diversity. Overall, I hope your visit proves to be an interesting one.

Remember: "Communication is the Doorway through which Understanding may Walk."

Winnona Houston

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

The White House is Still Working for LGBT Equality

by Cheryl Courtney-Evans
posted Oct. 10, 2012

"abitchforjustice": Alright, all my faithful readers, it's Gay Pride Week here in Atlanta, GA., and it just so happens that this year, it's also an election year. Sooo...I just thought this might be a good time to remind all of my Gender Non-Conforming (GNC; aka LBGT) friends that THIS administration has very openly supported our community and are still doing so in the midst of all the campaigning. I received the following transmission from the White House Administration this morning that reminds me of this, and I'm just passing the word along to you...

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Wednesday, October 10, 2012



Good morning,
Today, I'm proud to share a few recent steps taken by the Obama Administration to advance equality, justice, and dignity for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people.  Feel free to share this news with your colleagues and networks, and encourage them to sign up for updates.
Gautam Raghavan
Office of Public Engagement
The White House
LGBT@who.eop.gov 
Department of Education Releases Anti-Bullying Training Toolkit 
Last week, the U.S. Department of Education released a free, two-part training toolkitdesigned to reduce incidents of bullying, for use by classroom teachers and educators. The toolkit is designed to provide classroom teachers with the knowledge and skills to intervene in bullying behavior and to de-escalate threatening behaviors at school. It includes two modules: “Understanding and Intervening in Bullying Behavior” and “Creating a Supportive Classroom Climate.”
The training modules build upon the success of training materials previously released for school bus drivers in June 2011. Since that time, the school bus training materials have been used to train more than 100,000 of the nation’s bus drivers.
ONAP and CDC Observe National Gay Men's HIV/AIDS Awareness Day
According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), men who have sex with men (MSM) represent 2 percent of the U.S. population, yet account for more than half of both new HIV infections each year and Americans living with HIV. Since the beginning of the epidemic, nearly 350,000 gay and bisexual men with AIDS have died, and more than 8,000 still die each year.
September 27th was the fifth annual National Gay Men’s HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, an opportunity to reflect on the impact of HIV on gay and bisexual men across the country and to recommit to fighting the disease.
In observance of the day, Grant Colfax, Director of the White House Office of National AIDS Policy, authored a blog post describing the progress we have made in recent years to address HIV in LGBT populations, specifically through the National HIV/AIDS Strategy:
In 2010, President Obama released the nation’s first comprehensive National HIV/AIDS Strategy, which called for aligning resources where HIV is most concentrated, and implementing evidence-based, high-impact interventions to reduce new HIV infections, improving HIV-related health outcomes, and reducing HIV-related disparities. The Strategy has focused Federal, State, and local efforts on a combination prevention approach for gay men and other populations at high risk, including increasing HIV testing and HIV treatment, because studies demonstrate that increasing diagnosis rates and reducing viral loads will significantly reduce new HIV infections in disproportionately affected communities.
The National HIV/AIDS Strategy also calls for addressing stigma and discrimination as part of a comprehensive response to the HIV epidemic. In keeping with the goals of the Strategy, the Department of Justice has taken steps to enforce civil rights laws that protect the rights of persons living with HIV/AIDS, and has launched a website dedicated to fighting discrimination against people living with HIV/AIDS.
In addition, the following statement was released by Kevin Fenton, MD, Director of CDC’s National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and Tuberculosis Prevention:
On National Gay Men’s HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, we honor the remarkable history of gay men’s leadership in the fight against the HIV epidemic. Three decades ago, extraordinary community and public health prevention efforts led to dramatic declines in new HIV infections among men who have sex with men. Yet infection rates are now increasing among young gay and bisexual men, particularly men of color. We must not allow another generation to be devastated by this disease. Together we can, and must, revitalize the passion and dedication that helped turn back the HIV epidemic among gay men during its darkest days.
Research and surveillance data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention remind us that gay and bisexual men remain at the epicenter of the U.S. HIV epidemic. HIV prevention, education and testing for men who have sex with men remain top CDC priorities. As part of CDC’s High Impact Prevention approach to fighting HIV, we are working to ensure resources are directed to the activities that will have the greatest impact in reducing the toll among gay and bisexual men, and other populations at highest risk.
One of the most important things every gay and bisexual man can do to stop the spread of HIV is to get tested for the disease at least once a year. If you test negative, you’ll have peace of mind and can redouble your efforts to stay safe. And if you test positive, you can get the medical care and support that you need to keep healthy and protect others from infection. It’s a simple, quick way to reduce the toll of HIV, and can ultimately help us to turn the tide in the fight against AIDS in America. 

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